Tag Archives: chronic fatigue

What Does Chronic Fatigue Mean, Really?

 

 

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Because I’m not merely “tired” when Lyme  gets me in it’s grip, I’m far beyond that. Tired is what happens to well people who overdo. It’s what happens to heroines in Victorian novels who faint on chaises.

Isn’t there a better pronouncement for what happens to people with chronic illness—sometimes even when we do nothing at all?

In my opinion, “chronic fatigue” is so overused it has no meaning.  Continue reading

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10 Things I Wish I’d Known About Lyme Disease

IV treatment. Pills. More pills. I can't believe I made it through all that. When it could have been avoided...

That’s the little portable pump for my IV drugs. Then there were the pills. More pills. Harsh meds that made me sicker so I could get better. I can’t believe I made it through all that. When it could have been avoided…

 

 

It’s 2016, and I’m finally climbing out of the Lyme hell I fell into blindly four-and-a-half years ago. If only I’d known more, sooner.

Maybe I can help someone, somewhere, by offering a few things I was shocked to learn. Frankly, it is damned hard to pick just 10 things. But here goes:  Continue reading

O Canada

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I’m always a little stunned when I track this blog and am reminded that people from all over the world visit. So many of us are on the lookout for information.

Today I’m thinking about Canadians because lots of my traffic at the moment is coming from my neighbors to the north, who’ve been checking out my post from several years ago on how Lyme was affecting my brain at the time.  Looks like some of you are sharing the link on Facebook. Thank you!

Like others around the globe, many Canadians are having a tough time getting good treatment. Health officials just don’t get it (sound familiar?).

The nonprofit Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation says:  Continue reading

Video: Pathologist Alan MacDonald Addresses Important Lyme Questions

If you’re like me, you want to know the latest scoop on what scientists are learning about Lyme disease. In this May 2013 interview we hear again from pathologist Alan MacDonald. (This interview is part 2 of a 3-part series, see the first one here). I’ve noted some key points you can jump to if you don’t have time to view the entire interview.

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Burning Feet

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Photo by LifeLoveLyme

I’m pretty sure most people around the world who aren’t living with Lyme think the symptom list is this simple and straightforward:

  • bull’s-eye rash
  • flu-like symptoms

And I reckon that this false belief is a major reason persistent Lyme disease continues to be missed in people with a wide range of complaints physical, cognitive, and emotional.

Continue reading

Juicing Up My Diet

Can you eat all this lush veggie wonderfulness in one sitting? Photo by LifeLoveLyme

Can you eat all this lush veggie wonderfulness in one sitting?
Photo by LifeLoveLyme

Carrots, celery, brocoli, a hearty portion of kale, parsley, an apple and a big red beet: so much nutrition! A couple of day’s worth of vibrant vitamins, right?

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5 Ways to Help Others “See” Lyme

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Actually, I’ve learned many people need a little help from me to truly see the pain.

Lyme is known as an “invisible” disease. That’s because oftentimes we look pretty good on the outside despite feeling myriad symptoms inside. And—unfortunately—many of us are darned good at keeping those symptoms invisible.

My own reasons include:

  • I don’t want those around me to worry.
  • Pride.
  • I don’t want people to know how sick I really am because I’m afraid they’ll abandon me.
  • I hate the thought of becoming that depressing person who is constantly complaining about how crummy he or she feels.

But I’ve come to see that a dose of reality is a good thing. When people understand the seriousness of this illness, they offer empathy and support.

Beyond that, we need others to know how serious chronic Lyme can become, so more people understand diagnosis and prevention—and stay well.

Continue reading